Susan Bradley

Contributing Writer

Susan Bradley has been patching since before the Code Red/Nimda days and remembers exactly where she was when SQL slammer hit (trying to buy something on eBay and wondering why the Internet was so slow). She writes the Patch Watch column for Askwoody.com, is a moderator on the PatchManagement.org listserve, and writes a column of Windows security tips for CSOonline.com. In real life, she’s the IT wrangler at her firm, Tamiyasu, Smith, Horn and Braun, where she manages a fleet of Windows servers, Microsoft 365 deployments, Azure instances, desktops, a few Macs, several iPads, a few Surface devices, several iPhones and tries to keep patches up to date on all of them. In addition, she provides forensic computer investigations for the litigation consulting arm of the firm. She blogs at https://www.askwoody.com/tag/patch-lady-posts/ and is on twitter at @sbsdiva. She lurks on Twitter and Facebook, so if you are on Facebook with her, she really did read what you posted. She has a SANS/GSEC certification in security and prefers Heavy Duty Reynolds wrap for her tinfoil hat.

For Windows, it’s ‘squirrel away time’

April patch recap: Mostly quiet on the Microsoft front

April patch recap: Mostly quiet on the Microsoft front

April offered few patch surprises from Microsoft, and it’s been much quieter than March, when printing issues arose. Here’s a look at what we’ve seen — and some concerns about a new feature called ‘News and Interests.’

Skimping on drive space means Windows 10 update woes

Skimping on drive space means Windows 10 update woes

Too many users have encountered the dreaded “Windows needs more space” message when trying to update Windows 10. Here’s the bare minimum drive space business and IT professionals should shoot for.

Why 16 is the new 8 for Windows 10

Why 16 is the new 8 for Windows 10

Microsoft’s Teams collaboration platform has become something of a memory hog, meaning Windows 10 users need at least 16GB of RAM to keep things running smoothly.

Windows Update for Business: details, details

Windows Update for Business: details, details

Though most Windows 10 users assume Windows update for Business is mainly for, well, business use, it offers plenty of options for controlling updates and working with Intune.

Patch Tuesday recap: This month, an ‘Ides of March’ update?

Patch Tuesday recap: This month, an ‘Ides of March’ update?

As the month winds down, some users may still be having issues with problematic printer drivers and updates. Here’s how to move beyond them.

How Azure Active Directory helps manage identity for remote users

How Azure Active Directory helps manage identity for remote users

Still using Active Directory to manage identity for remote workers? You might want to consider moving to Azure Active Directory.

Microsoft, we need to have a talk

Microsoft, we need to have a talk

This time it's not us, it's you, Microsoft. Your patching process and flawed updates are still creating problems.

Stuck on Windows 10 1909? Some workarounds on moving forward

Stuck on Windows 10 1909? Some workarounds on moving forward

The next feature release of Windows 10, 21H1, is due out in the next couple months. But what happens if you’re still on an older version and want to get unstuck? Here’s what to do.

Pause Patch Tuesday updates, watch out for Exchange server attacks

Pause Patch Tuesday updates, watch out for Exchange server attacks

It’s usually better to wait when Microsoft releases its monthly updates to avoid potential problems. That’s true for March. But companies using Microsoft Exchange should make sure they’re not affected by recent attacks.

Of February’s patches, Ignite, and the fate of Windows 10 feature releases

Of February’s patches, Ignite, and the fate of Windows 10 feature releases

February's over, so it's time to focus on this week's Microsoft Ignite event — and what the company has in mind for future features updates for Windows 10.

How to protect Windows Remote Desktop deployments

How to protect Windows Remote Desktop deployments

Attackers gain access to your Windows network just as work-from-home employees do: remotely. Following these simple steps will send them looking for easier targets.

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